Key West CitizenAugust 6, 2017

Photo provided
Walter C. Maloney was a lawyer and had served in the state Legislature from Monroe County and as Mayor of Key West. He died in 1884.

Photo provided Walter C. Maloney was a lawyer and had served in the state Legislature from Monroe County and as Mayor of Key West. He died in 1884.

1856: William Hackley recorded in his diary: Rose at 4:30 a.m. and walked on the beach, returned home and bathed. At 7:40 a.m., barometer 29.51, thermometer 85, wind south southwest 3, clouds 7. A good breeze all night after the squall. Saw several Robin Snipe on the beach and heard some Yellowlegs in the ponds. A heavy squall with thunder passed west at 10 p.m.

1884: Walter C. Maloney died in Key West at 71. He was a lawyer and had served in the state Legislature from Monroe County and as Mayor of Key West. During the Civil War, he was a union supporter and organized a volunteer corps in Key West. On July 4, 1876, he gave a speech which was a short history of the island. Later, this was published as the first written history of Key West.

1887: William Cooper was hung from a gallows in the jail yard at the Monroe County courthouse on Whitehead Street. He was convicted in circuit court for the murder of Liverpool Bain and George Hudson, fellow charcoal burners on Big Pine Key.

1892: Collector of Customs John Horr was having electric lights installed in the new custom house as it was feared that odor from the gas lights could cause loss of life.

1901: An election was held for bonds to improve the public school, build an armory, repair the county courthouse and continue the county road. Only 200 of the 900 qualified voters cast their ballots. All the issues were defeated.

1909: Chief Gunner Charles Morgan, U.S. Navy, retired from the Naval Station. Morgan was the senior diver who conducted the investigation on the Battleship Maine in 1898.

1917: The following doctors and surgeons were called into the military for war service: J.Y. Porter Sr., J.Y. Porter Jr., J.N. Fogarty, Eugene C. Lowe, Harry C. Galey and C.B. Fogarty, dental surgeon.

1931: The dredge Absecon is working in the Northwest Channel and had removed more than 200,000 yards of mud since it began on June 17. The work continued until Sept. 1.

1953: The fourth and fifth cases of polio were reported when a Navy man and his wife were taken to the Navy Hospital with what was diagnosed as “the non-paralytic type of polio.”